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Special Issue "Mast Cells and Fibrosis "

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Scott Levick
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine and Health, the University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Interests: cardiac fibrosis; heart failure; neuropeptides; inflammatory cell; diabetes

Special Issue Information

Mast cells (MCs) are non-circulating immune cells that develop only when bone marrow-derived precursors have reached their target tissue. These tissue MCs then go through several stages of maturation driven primarily by the c-kit ligand, a stem cell factor, with the final MC phenotype being highly dependent on the microenvironment in which they reside. While mast cells are classically linked to allergic reactions, particularly anaphylaxis, these cells also contribute to other processes within the body—some beneficial and some detrimental. Accumulating evidence suggests that mast cells are important in promoting fibrosis in numerous organs. This Special Issue on “Mast Cells and Fibrosis” welcomes submissions that both support a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells as well as evidence against mast cells being pro-fibrotic, and the studies can relate to any organ.

Dr. Scott Levick
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.dlhwdz.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Crosstalk between Mast Cells and Lung Fibroblasts Is Modified by Alveolar Extracellular Matrix and Influences Epithelial Migration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(2), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22020506 - 06 Jan 2021
Abstract
Mast cells play an important role in asthma, however, the interactions between mast cells, fibroblasts and epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are less known. The objectives were to investigate the effect of mast cells on fibroblast activity and migration of epithelial [...] Read more.
Mast cells play an important role in asthma, however, the interactions between mast cells, fibroblasts and epithelial cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are less known. The objectives were to investigate the effect of mast cells on fibroblast activity and migration of epithelial cells. Lung fibroblasts from IPF patients and healthy individuals were co-cultured with LAD2 mast cells or stimulated with the proteases tryptase and chymase. Human lung fibroblasts and mast cells were cultured on cell culture plastic plates or decellularized human lung tissue (scaffolds) to create a more physiological milieu by providing an alveolar extracellular matrix. Released mediators were analyzed and evaluated for effects on epithelial cell migration. Tryptase increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release from fibroblasts, whereas co-culture with mast cells increased IL-6 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Culture in scaffolds increased the release of VEGF compared to culture on plastic. Migration of epithelial cells was reduced by IL-6, while HGF and conditioned media from scaffold cultures promoted migration. In conclusion, mast cells and tryptase increased fibroblast release of mediators that influenced epithelial migration. These data indicate a role of mast cells and tryptase in the interplay between fibroblasts, epithelial cells and the alveolar extracellular matrix in health and lung disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mast Cells and Fibrosis )
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of the Evidence for and against a Role for Mast Cells in Cutaneous Scarring and Fibrosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(24), 9673; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21249673 - 18 Dec 2020
Abstract
Scars are generated in mature skin as a result of the normal repair process, but the replacement of normal tissue with scar tissue can lead to biomechanical and functional deficiencies in the skin as well as psychological and social issues for patients that [...] Read more.
Scars are generated in mature skin as a result of the normal repair process, but the replacement of normal tissue with scar tissue can lead to biomechanical and functional deficiencies in the skin as well as psychological and social issues for patients that negatively affect quality of life. Abnormal scars, such as hypertrophic scars and keloids, and cutaneous fibrosis that develops in diseases such as systemic sclerosis and graft-versus-host disease can be even more challenging for patients. There is a large body of literature suggesting that inflammation promotes the deposition of scar tissue by fibroblasts. Mast cells represent one inflammatory cell type in particular that has been implicated in skin scarring and fibrosis. Most published studies in this area support a pro-fibrotic role for mast cells in the skin, as many mast cell-derived mediators stimulate fibroblast activity and studies generally indicate higher numbers of mast cells and/or mast cell activation in scars and fibrotic skin. However, some studies in mast cell-deficient mice have suggested that these cells may not play a critical role in cutaneous scarring/fibrosis. Here, we will review the data for and against mast cells as key regulators of skin fibrosis and discuss scientific gaps in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mast Cells and Fibrosis )
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